Ukraine War Day #263: The Cat On The Chain

У лукоморья дуб зеленый; At Lukomorye there is a green oak tree;
Златая цепь на дубе том: There is a golden chain tied around the tree:
И днем и ночью кот ученый Both day and night a learned cat
Всё ходит по цепи кругом; Walks in a circle while tied to the chain;
Идет направо — песнь заводит, He walks to the right – sings a song,
Налево — сказку говорит. Walks to the left – tells a story.

Dear Readers:

That, of course, is the famous opening stanza of Alexander Pushkin’s poem Ruslan and Ludmila. This charming fairy tale, set in times of medieval Rus, tells of the brave Knight Ruslan and his search for his kidnapped bride, Ludmila, daughter of Prince Vladimir of Kiev. The narrator hears this tale from the mouth of the Learned Cat of the Introduction.

The Wizard Chernomor took Ludmila to his fine palace in Crimea.

While frisky Princess Ludmila is busy learning the ins and outs of her kidnapper’s palace and garden, stealing his invisibility cap and learning the secret of his magical powers (= his mile-long beard!); meanwhile her frustrated hubby is trying his darndest to get her back so that they can finally consummate their marriage. As befits any Knight, Ruslan must set off on a quest and overcome many trials of his courage and fidelity, before his ultimate defeat of the Wizard Chernomor. The wizard’s name itself means “Black Sea” (Chornoe More), as befits a sorcerer who holds the Greek peninsula of Crimea as his base. And that’s not the only Black Sea reference here: the fabled Lukomorye (whose name means something like “Arc on the Sea”), the home base of Pushkin’s magical cat, has an actual physical location: It’s called the Kinburn Spit. In modern geographical terms, this fang-like sandbar poking out into the Black Sea, is considered to be a part of the Nikolaev Oblast of Ukraine.

But is the Kinburn Spit truly Ukrainian? Not if you asked Pushkin: “Там русской дух… там Русью пахнет!” (“The Russian spirit is there … it smells of Rus!”, Pushkin wrote about this magical location.) Well, Ukraina is Rus too, right? I would say yes, both Russians and Ukrainians were born of the same Mother. But Bandera says no, so what he says goes. Besides, the Ukrainian Banderas banned Pushkin and defaced his statues.

A Thorn In Ukraine’s Side

Well, technically the Spit still “smells” of Russia. In that the Russian army still has a post there. I saw this piece by reporter Andrei Rezchikov, which explains the current sitrep.

Rezchikov: After the Russians left Kherson, this [tiny] peninsula acquired even greater significance. From this sandbar (40 km in length times a mere 9 km in width) the Russians can shell objects in Nikolaev (a mere 50 km away) and surrounding areas from long-range artillery. This is the only chunk of Nikolaev Oblast that is under Russian control. This is the legendary Lukomorye of Pushkinian fame.

Russians soldiers first arrived there in June. During the battle for control, the Russian navy was able to sink the Ukrainian ship Vinnitsa. The Russian soldiers currently guarding this strategic location belong to a special anti-diversionary unit called Vikhr (Whirlwind). During that time of chaos, many ideas were being bandied about; it was thought that the Spit might form the bridgehead for a maritime attack against Nikolaev, after first blocking the port of Ochakov. Well, those ambitious plans never came to fruition.

It goes without saying that the Ukrainians want the Russians out of there; and want to return the Spit to their own control. For starters, to put an end to Russian shelling of Nikolaev. Ukrainian Special Ops located in Ochakov have been posed the task, how to get the Russians off the Spit. According to some media, the Ukrainians are preparing an operation using helicopters and riverboats (cutters). Although Ukraine doesn’t have much of a navy any more, they do have a Dniepr River flotilla, including cutters carrying rockets. In mid-September they did attempt a landing on the Spit, but were repulsed. We hereby enter into the now-familiar debate, similar to the previous Snake Island one; and then Kherson: Should Russia fight with all means to keep this bridgehead? Or should they leave? In other words, is it worth the effort to keep it?

First we hear the opinions of military expert Yury Knutov, who manages the Air Defense Museum for the Russian military. Knutov: We need to hold the Spit, because the ability to hammer Nikolaev with long-range artillery trumps every other consideration. “The most important thing now is to hold onto Zaporozhie and the Donetsk and Red Liman fronts. If the enemy is able to penetrate to Berdyansk, then there will be a serious problem with Crimea’s water supply; not to mention that such a move would divide our army into two pieces.”

Yury Knutov: We might leave it, but then we’ll be back next year…

Despite this, Knutov believes that a Russian retreat from the Spit is still a theoretical possibility, due to the factor of a difficult supply situation. He reassures that, even should Russia withdraw from the Spit, they could still take it back next year. [yalensis: Color me NOT reassured to hear such speculations!] After the newly mobilized troops are in place and Russia’s technological refurbishment is in full swing.

Military expert Vasily Dandykin, on the other hand, is convinced that Russia currently has the resources to hold and defend this strategic point. Especially now that the days are getting shorter. Dandykin: “Our troops out on the Spit are very experienced and battle-hardened guys. Troops rotation continues on schedule. We need to keep this Platzdarm in our rear, even taking into account that a portion of our troops freed up from Kherson are going to be thrown into the Zaporozhie front. Everything depends on the plans of the Russian Command, whatever they are planning for the winter campaign. Nonetheless, I am convinced that we can hold onto the Spit, taking into account all the components, including the naval aspect.”

Dandykin points out that the Kinburn Spit is a constant thorn in the side of the Ukrainians. Therefore they will continue their efforts to get it back. It’s all a timing issue now: The race to train all these newly-mobilized troops and get them into position. “The main advantage of the Spit is its proximity to Ochakov and Nikolaev. And also Kherson. All these points are very close to each other.”

In conclusion: What is going to happen with this amazing stretch of land? Which does indeed look like a thorn pointing right back to the mainland. Will the Russian army abandon it, as they did Snake Island? Or will they continue to hold onto this strategic location?

Nobody can see into the future. Except maybe the wise cat on the chain. He knows all the answers, but he isn’t telling!

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39 Responses to Ukraine War Day #263: The Cat On The Chain

  1. mtnforge says:

    No question, keep it. No way do you give the enemy such a foot in the door to territory you hold. Be like gay marriage, once it was “legitimate” thats all they needed to go full retard perverted-depraved. Neo-nazi’s too. Can not give them any strategic leverage.
    There’s another factor, may be it is an outlier, but the demons running DC would love them some docking rights on any fringe of Russian sovereign territory, that close to Crimea, oh yeah, bet your sweet bippy, in a New York minute.
    I hope those Russian boys defending the spit got really deep ammunition caches in their emplacements and fast air cover. A cruiser and some gunboats too.
    The ukies are going to send countless men to their watery graves attempting to take the spit. Only way to it is over open flat water. Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant assaults times 4 fold, another mini meat-grinder, now that the Russian’s, professionally with great dignity out foxed them all, leaving Kershon for far more sensible ground, with an almost impassible river delta/marsh land buffer, plus tactically blew the bridges over the Dnieper is such a way its a lethal chore to try repair them under combat conditions, leaving the ukies with even more drain on their resources, then turned their backs, said Nyet! This here. No further. Molan Labe.
    Abandoning the right bank we are going to see, it turns out to be a master play.

    Like

    • No so into your anti-gay marriage comparison. I’m all for LGTBQ rights, including gay marriage. Live and let live.

      Like

      • yalensis says:

        I agree with you and officially take your side on this issue, deschutesmaple.
        By the way, I don’t know if you are aware, but about a month ago, the Cuban government officially legalized gay marriage!
        Yup, that the Cuban Communist government. How far they have come from Stalinism, in this respect. Basically, it’s a civilizational thing. The Cubans are still Communists, but they are also part of the Latin American/Spanish civilizational space, so they are sensitive to those sexual currents.

        [Here I refrain from making inappropriate jokes about Catholic priests!]

        Anyhow, I had read about this in the Russian press, here.
        I saved that link, thinking I might do a post on it at some point, but war issues took precedence over cultural issues.

        Liked by 1 person

        • That’s really cool, that Cuba did that. A free, civilized society regardless of its economic system should without question allow people to simply be themselves without fear of suppression, harassment, etc. Know I’m repeating myself here, but many of the alt-right bloggers who support the Russian side like Saker, Larry ‘CIA’ Johnson, Andrei Martyanov, Gonzalo Lira, Douglas MacGregor, et al. are very anti-LGTBQ and actually make this a wedge issue. They identify with the Russian government’s anti-gay position and mock the ‘decadent west’s’ tolerance of LGTBQs. “Men having babies” hyperbole, ya know. Lame-o!

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  2. zina says:

    Whenever Pushkin’s Russian Genius is mentioned, the gigolo Dantes also comes to mind. Emperor Peter the Great opened Russia to Europe, and in the first Westerners arrive in Moscow, with wigs on their heads, with high-heeled shoes and buckles, with peacock-like wings. The exact opposite of the Russian man Muzhik as an honorific for a man of powerful mind and body with an almost tender heart. It so happened once that the gigolo Dantes insulted a Russian lady, Alexander Pushkin was present there and asked Dantes to apologize to the lady, but the arrogant gigolo refused. Pushkin challenged him to a duel for insulting a Russian lady, and a duel was arranged. Many dissuaded Pushkin, who was not the least bit skilled with a weapon, as opposed to a gigolo whose trade was that. But Pushkin stuck to his Russian spirit of culture. And Dantes killed Pushkin in a duel, a French gigolo killed a Russian genius. And after that, Dantes walked around Moscow, and not a single Russian did anything ugly to him, that is the Vertical highest point of the Russian Spirit, which is the only one bigger than the Kremlin. It is the same today, the relationship between Europe and its cultural spirit is a gigolo, in relation to the spirit of culture of the Russian people.

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    • yalensis says:

      A stanza from Lermontov’s poem “The Death of a Poet”:


      Его убийца хладнокровно
      Навел удар… спасенья нет:
      Пустое сердце бьется ровно.
      В руке не дрогнул пистолет,
      […]
      Смеясь, он дерзко презирал
      Земли чужой язык и нравы;
      Не мог щадить он нашей славы;
      Не мог понять в сей миг кровавый,
      На что́ он руку поднимал!..

      His killer cold-bloodedly
      Aimed the bullet… there was nothing to be done:
      An empty heart beats evenly.
      The hand with the pistol did not tremble.
      […]
      Laughing, he rudely despised
      The language and culture of a foreign land;
      He did not spare our nation’s glory;
      He could not comprehend, in that bloody moment,
      Just whom he had destroyed!

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    • Cortes says:

      Another Dantes was the hero created by a French mulato…

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Dantès

      Like

      • yalensis says:

        Yeah! Dumas’ Dantès was a good guy, though. Pushkin’s Dantès was a murderous gigolo, as zina pointed out! But apparently he had high connections and some kind of “krysha” in the Tsar’s court, so he was allowed to get away with killing Pushkin, even though dueling was technically illegal.

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  3. peter moritz says:

    Sorry – or actually not – to veer off track, but in this interview, as a theme throughout, he answers the question I was asking ever since the SMO began, of why Russia did not force Europe to its knees with a total blockade of energy and raw materials. He answers it comprehensively and to my complete satisfaction.
    It might not be a complete truth, but his answer makes the most sense and is deeper and more logical than what I have heard either from the Saker and his acolytes or from the crowd at Martyanov’s blog.
    And of course, Ritter’s host is not difficult to look at, which helps in this long interview that I watched almost without interruption.

    Liked by 1 person

    • yalensis says:

      Thanks for the link, peter! Agree that the host is quite beautiful and intelligent, which is a marvelous combination.
      And Scott always interesting to get his take on things, he is underestimated sometimes, but I think he really knows his stuff.

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  4. Bilaal Abdullah says:

    Awfully unclear map!

    Like

  5. John Thurloe says:

    There is an explosion of controversy by those alleging that an opposition faction is formed inside Russia of those somewhat more than just disappointed with the conduct of affairs by President Putin. It is said that orders of the president are being obstructed. This being fueled, in part one supposes, by that part of the public and the Duma or other elected officials at the embarassing state of affairs in the Ukraine. Also, that the inertness of Russia in the face of aggressive sanctions and insults is increasingly being viewed as a national humiliation. Sources are both from inside and outside Russia.

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    • yalensis says:

      John, would you care to elaborate and provide links?

      Like

      • peter moritz says:

        I looked through about 5 google pages searching for “internal opposition to Putin’s war in Ukraine” and the most recent reports were from early October, regarding some protests against the mobilization.


        it is actually quite funny, evidence-free but with scary music.

        https://www.wionews.com/world/how-russias-putin-escaped-five-assassination-bids-516511
        “Disclaimer: A number of claims and counterclaims are being made on the Ukraine-Russia conflict on the ground and online. While WION takes utmost care to accurately report this developing news story, we cannot independently verify the authenticity of all statements, photos and videos.”

        Yeah, right,

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        • BM says:

          Yea, usual evidence free fairy tails! [sic – mistyped, was about to correct, changed my mind]

          Like

        • yalensis says:

          Westies should be careful what they wish for. If Putin IS replaced by some internal soft coup, then it won’t be Navalny stepping into the Kremlin. It will be some hard-liner, maybe even somebody we never heard of.

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          • John Thurloe says:

            There has been criticism of Putin and his ‘campaign’ from within the Duma, from various Communist Party factions, from the pubic, from the Strelkov partisans. The more recent matter concerns higher apparatchiks.

            Whyever would there not be expressions of unhappiness considering this faltering campaign? Certainly, various constituencies have a right to give such expression. And it looks like Wokeism when people like the Saker denounce all who just disagree with him. Given his shoddy analysis of the situation. None of this would or should be happening at all if the Russia + Allies had finished the job and long ago. What is happening now is due to a lack of competence and the absense of will. Victory brings unity. Defeat brings doubt. Of course, discordant voices are entitled to have their say. As they should.

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            • yalensis says:

              I am not sure I would use the word “woke” to describe the Saker – LOL!

              Speaking of woke-ism, I saw some amusing misunderstanding in the Russian press regarding the American idiom “welfare queen”. I thought about doing a post on this, but there were too many other things going on.

              Recall that conservative pundit Candace Owens, on Tucker Carlson’s show, used the expression “welfare queen” to describe Zelensky.
              Everyone familiar with American politics (and the origins of this term, back in Reagan’s time, when he used it to describe black people he didn’t like, the mythical “black welfare queens driving around in their Cadillacs”), would understand exactly what Candace meant. And would also get the racial/political piquancy of a conservative African-American pundit employing this term against somebody she doesn’t like.

              Amusingly, the Russian press and public totally did NOT get this reference, and just jumped to the conclusion that there was some kind of woke “gender politics” going on here. Namely, with the use of a female term “queen” to describe a male, like Zelensky.

              Ach, it’s just too complicated to explain. One would have to delve into the entire history of American racial politics. Something was definitely lost in the translation there. What I am trying to say, is that the use of the word “queen” has nothing to do with gender!

              Like

              • BM says:

                the use of the word “queen” has nothing to do with gender!

                Quite so, Yalensis, anyone can be a queen, god forbid restricting the role to any one of the (however you count them) genders! And self-evidently anyone who whacks [its] dick on a piano while wearing high heels is eminently so qualified for the title . 😉 Conversely, any hypothetical head of state who whacked [its] strap-on on a piano while wearing army boots is presumably also entitled to the title of “king”.

                Like

          • peter moritz says:

            Regarding regime change:
            https://belsat.eu/pl/news/08-11-2022-waszym-zadaniem-jest-zabicie-putina-relacja-ze-zjazdu-rosyjskich-opozycjonistow-w-jablonnie/

            The arrogance of those panelists, and their hypocrisy is breathtaking, in scope and in methodology.
            A fucking 26 attending participants, representing an average of 120 000 Russian voters each, claim to speak for 140 million Russians? Are those guys for real, do they atually realize they are gnats controlled by the USA (NATO) permitted to buzz arund because it is convenient for their master to pester the bear – the bear being the Russian population. A population in ist majority not against this conflict, rather, this conflict for the majority of them is pursued too crefully, too slowly, with to little impact on Ukraine itself.

            Do they realize that they are real traitors, trying to replace by force an elected president, elected by over 50% of eligible voters in 2018 (67% of eligible voters, 77% voted for Putin)? How many US citizens voted for Biden? Biden received a bit over 30% of eligible Voters.

            And those gnats try to enforce their will – with what and how, BTW, – on the population of the Russian Federation?
            Their delusions are staggering, and under any circumstances would require Psychiatric care and gentle treatment to disabuse them from their delusions of grandeur.

            Like

    • peter moritz says:

      What a relief, it means that Putin is still alive and has not been replaced by
      a double. But my is he still suffers from Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Brain and Bowel cancer, and is mentally unstable, as his performances during his public appearances so clearly demonstrate.

      I guess pretty soon he will be replaced by Navalny, who prepares in prison for his new role, or maybe General Surovikin will take over after the putsch, of course, with Putin being attacked by a Novichock chemical weapon, which he miraculously will survive, thus is the efficiency as we know. After his survival, he will be incarcerated on a luxury yacht of one of his oligarch friends, left to cuddle with his dogs.
      Surovikin, should he be so lucky and step into the shoes Putin left behind, will start to nuclear-bomb another power station, just to show he is serious and the Berlin Tempelhof Airport and Hitler’s old mountain lair, the Berghof, because he thinks those are the Azov’s hideouts.

      One tries to figure out which will be the tales told in front of a blazing fireplace by the ever well-informed media and spy agencies of the west.

      Like

      • peter moritz says:

        “But my hunch is” of course

        Like

      • John Thurloe says:

        Cde. Nikita Sergeyevich didn’t see it coming either so out of the rubbish you correctly site there may be yet gestating… It was supposed to be a campaign, in part, to de-militarize the Ukies. By the agency of the all-powerful Russian military led by Iron Vlad. How’s that turned out, eh? The Russians are in retreat a long way from Odessa. The Brits blow up Nordstream and the Kremlin issues – a statement. You can be certain that the Russian military officeriate is seething at this insult to their prowess. When they could very easily do better. Try connecting the dots here. A lot of other parties might be inclined to get on this bandwagon. You won’t see it until it’s over.

        Like

        • peter moritz says:

          You confuse the grinding down of the Ukrainian army with the need to occupy territory. The grinding down so far works perfectly when you consider that the Ukrainian army suffered about 100 000 deaths, which means at a ratio of 1/3 of death vs. injured soldiers it lost somewhere about 250 000 – 300 000 soldiers, vs. about 18 000 soldiers by the Russian army.

          And maybe you should watch the Ritter interview, why Russia might not be interested in Odessa at all if you had followed what Putin answered with regards to that question.

          Russia cannot afford to completely destroy the Ukrainian economy, as this would leave a festering wound that Russia would have to fight for years to come, similarily had it seriously destroyed European economies by withholding gas and oil, which as of later this year Europe will do to itself anyway.

          Different from the USA, who is protected by the oceans, Russia borders all countries involved in this conflict except the USA, so unfortunately military problems are not the only concern, and that is why Russia did not bomb Kiev, nor did it destroy completely the electrical grid.

          To control territory, aside from the Donbas area, actually limits the force that can deal will the destruction of the enemies forces, and this is why Kherson and Kharkov were given up, both with incomparable heavier losses to Ukraine in men and equipment than for the Russian army. Once the grinding down will have been achieved to a sufficient extent, the regaining of lost territory will commence. The question then will just be what territory?

          Remember Clausewitz: “The fighting forces must be destroyed: that is, they must be put in such a condition that they can no longer carry on the fight. Whenever we use the phrase “destruction of the enemy’s forces” this alone is what we mean.
          The country must be occupied; otherwise the enemy could raise fresh
          military forces”

          Like

          • John Thurloe says:

            Sorry Peter but that line of apologia has worn thin. I think it is correct and I don’t disagree as far as it goes but… Nobody reckoned that the Ukies would fight with so much grit. They may be crazy but they are not running away so much. Plus, they have kept at this for some time. The point being Moscow did not and has not calculated this properly. And that is Bad Intelligence. Not to be tolerated by any army wherever. Excuses do not cut it here. Consequently, the extent of deployed Russian forces were and are insufficient. Consequently, Russia has had to rely on air, missile and artillery more than should have been the case. The Americans see this and know it for what it is. Some heads have rolled but a lot more should too.

            The goals for this campaign were formally and clearly stated. “De-militarize and liberate”. That has not happened. This has been going on for months. As it stands, the Russian campaign is a failure. And this is politically toxic. The situation can be corrected. I hope that will be so. But while Ukie artillery still shells Donetsk this stinks.

            I believe the Russian military has all the means and skills to complete this mission. And very smartly too. This mess is Putin’s fault. A political failure. And, I am certain that blizzards of meetings are taking place right now with the prospect of taking whatever measures are necessary to ensure that mis-leadership like this does not persist. Of course, Big Bad Vlad could just let loose the hounds from hell. All would be forgiven then. But in Russia, the tradition is this state of affairs cannot be permitted to continue.

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            • yalensis says:

              Well, if I were the President of Russia, I would have accepted the North Korean offer to send troops into the conflict.
              Can you imagine the effect of 1,000,000 ferocious North Korean soldiers attacking on a broad front? I think the war would have been over in a couple of hours.

              Of course, I am not the President of Russia, and that is probably a very good thing, because I would be too hot-headed.

              Like

  6. Ortensio F. says:

    Entiendo que Rusia se encuentra muy cercana a un golpe palaciego en modo L. Brezhnev, N.Podgorny, A. Kosyguin , protegido por los oficiales de grado medio del ejercito .

    ¿ Quien será el Brezhnev de turno

    ¿ N. Patrushev

    ……………………………………………

    Like

    • yalensis says:

      Thanks, Ortensio. That’s an interesting theory about a possible “palace coup” brewing in the Kremlin. I don’t know enough about Patrushev to know if he is the guy.
      I suspect that Medvedev may have been positioning himself for this role, by refurbishing his image a hard-liner to the left of Putin!

      Like

  7. BM says:

    I have a request, Yalensis. See this absolutely masterful piece by Bhadrakumar here posted today.

    In a recent op-Ed in Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Russian Special Presidential Envoy for Afghanistan Zamir Kabulov alleged that Britain is financing a so-called “Afghan resistance” against the Taliban (which is reportedly operating out of Panjshir.) Kabulov wrote that the US is baiting two Central Asian states by offering them helicopters and aircraft in lieu of cooperation in covert activities against the Taliban.

    Kabulov made a sensational disclosure that the US is blackmailing the Taliban leaders by threatening them with a drone attack unless they broke off contacts with Russia and China. He said, specifically, that the US and Britain are demanding that Kabul should refrain from restricting the activities of Afghanistan-based Uyghur terrorists.

    Interestingly, Moscow is exploring the creation of a compact group of five regional states who are stakeholders in Afghanistan’s stabilisation and could work together. Kabulov mentioned Iran, Pakistan, India and China as Russia’s partners.

    Which are the two Central Asian states (maybe Tajikistan and Uzbekistan? The only other plausible candidate is probably Kyrgisia), and can you find more information about this sensational development? It would make a great article for today!

    Russia should try to persuade the Taliban to let them base an air defence battery (best under Russian control) in Afghanistan to shoot down any such US drones and terrorist aircraft; sovereignty is a fickle thing though.

    Like

    • BM says:

      (Incidentally, I am not convinced that the latest strategic developments between Russia and Iran reflect “the long haul in Ukraine” as such, I think it is within the realms of possibility that the war in Ukraine (but NOT the war in Europe) might be wound up within less than a year, but rather reflect the very broad multi-modal and multi-geolocic war between the US and Russia, which will certainly go on for years or until the US is definitively defeated.)

      Like

    • yalensis says:

      Thanks for the link, BM. I quickly skimmed the article, and will study it more carefully when I get home from work tonight.
      Along with all these other Central Asian shenanigans, one might also add the terrorist attack in Istanbul yesterday. It was clearly an American operation designed to scare the Turks into getting more with the NATO line and stop being so independent-minded.

      Using a crude American expression, seems like the Americans “picked the wrong n*gger to f*ck with” this time. I just saw a tweet this morning: Erdoğan rejected the condolences of the American Embassy, saying he knew damn well who was behind this egregious attack against ordinary Turkish civilians.

      (Investigation is ongoing, but seems like the Americans used Kurdish proxies for this one. They caught the woman-terrorist, she was not a suicide bomber, apparently, so the Turks were able to capture her before she was able to high-tail it to Greece.)

      Like

  8. John Thurloe says:

    Some Russian published opinion. Worth taking into consideration.

    Oleg Tsarev. A rather prominent person:

    “Donbass has been shelled for 8 years, and its residents are not given housing certificates. There is no mass evacuation. Compare the shelling of Donetsk and Kherson – Donetsk is shelled hundreds of times harder. There is no water. Poor people drain the water that is not in the tap from the batteries, so there is no heat. Yes, there is no river with a dam between Donetsk and Rostov, and people can always be taken out, but the situation still looks strange. Kherson residents began to be taken out almost immediately after joining. There is a feeling that at first one decision was made on Kherson, a referendum was held, but then something changed. They built a line of defense on the left bank. They took out the authorities and froze.”

    “I have written many times about the significance of Kherson and why we should fight for it: if Kherson is captured by the Armed Forces of Ukraine, the land road to Crimea will come under fire, the dam will almost certainly be blown up, and there will be no water in Crimea after that. If, after the capture of Kherson, the Ukrainian Armed Forces blow up the Crimean bridge, then Crimea will be blockaded.”

    Larisa Shesler. Also a person of note.

    “I can’t understand why they disperse the moan about the inevitability of the surrender of Kherson. They write: “battles near Kherson in Snigirevka”, “battle near Kherson in Pravdino”. Has anyone even looked at the map? From Snigirevka to Kherson – 54 km along the highway, from Pravdino – more than 30 km. This is much more than the front line from Donetsk or Gorlovka. Why is no one shouting about the inevitability of the surrender of Svatovo? Why are the residents of Lisichansk not urgently evicted, because these cities are much closer to the advancing Armed Forces of Ukraine?”

    “In order to take Kherson, even if it is defended by a 10-strong group, at least 40-strong army is needed, and at least 2 months of fierce fighting. And if it is defended by a military group armed with tanks, equipped with aircraft and MLRS, it is impossible to take it. But, of course, it can be RENTED. Surrender, as they surrendered Balakleya or the deserted Kupyansk. But it seems to me that the limit for the surrender of territories and cities has already been exceeded in the Kharkiv region. Moreover, today Kherson is a Russian city, and its surrender is a direct betrayal of the Russian lands. People are afraid not of defeat, but of betrayal.”

    “Rented” properly translates as ‘sold’. To the Americans. In a deal. “We”, the Russians, let, allow the Ukies to score a ‘victory. Mr. Z shows up. Struts about. Declares a big Ukie victory. The ‘deal’ is that the US forces negotiations. Look at todays news. The Kremlin acknowledges it is holding secret talks with the Americans. Pravda is openly musing about a Pakistan-India situation.

    These are local people. Who think they are being sold out by the Kremlin. Abandoned. Betrayal. They give their evidence, reasoning. Any ‘deal’ at all would mean the abandonment of the Russian campaign. It would mean a Russian defeat. Let’s see how this unfolds. Let’s see what the Russian military might do about such a stain on their honour. Not exactly a super-sneaky Russian not-really-a-retreat scenario, eh?

    Like

  9. james says:

    beautiful piece of land at any rate!!! thanks for the puzzle and question.. i abstain from answering… i plead ignorance on these types of matters…

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