Ukraine War Day #127: Russia Versus The World? [concluded]

Dear Readers:

Today concluding my review of this piece. Where we left off, things were looking fairly bleak for Russia, on the Central Asia front. Seems like Western NGO’s and Gauleiters have the region eating out of their hands, with corruption and greed being the main motivators. Regional and national elites must toe the Westie line by snubbing Russia, going along with the sanctions, and saying nice things about the Ukraine.

On the other hand, Russia does have a nice card in the deck: the so-called Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), aka the “Tashkent Pact”. In Russian it’s called Организация Договора о коллективной безопасности (ОДКБ). This treaty joins Russia with Kazakhstan, Kirgizia and Armenia; and, realistically might become the hub whereby Russia evades sanctions.

In this police line-up: the Presidents of the CSTO nations.

Here is the racket: all of these countries (except for Russia) enjoy all the wonderful privileges of trading with the West. They are allowed to purchase marvelous goods which appear, a little bit later, on the shelves of Russian stores. As the Russian news agency “Sputnik” reports, hardly had Coca-Cola disappeared from Russia when — boom! — it’s suddenly back again. Along with other delicious beverages such as Fanta and Sprite. The only difference is, the labels are now written in the Kirgiz language. It’s a win-win situation: the Central Asian countries turn a nice profit by re-selling Westie goods to hungry Russian consumers; and said Russian consumers are not forced to make that fatal choice between patriotism and a refreshing cola. And, oh so typical, of that Asian “bazaar” mentality of which everyone speaks: Political rhetoric is one thing, economic reality and hard cash are something else entirely.

Next we meet another pundit named Semen (pronounced “Semyon”, and obviously a variant of the Biblical name Simon) Uralov. His specialty is studying the post-Soviet political and economic space.

Semen Uralov

Uralov explains how Russia’s post-Soviet allies find themselves trapped between Scylla and Charybdis. Navigating this dangerous strait requires very clear rules about what is expected/required of each partner, in a tight inter-relationship based on the notion of parity. His interpretation of the declarations made by Kazakhstan and Kirgizia regarding the Ukraine situation: This is simply an attempt to preserve the appearance of a neutral status, based on the need to avoid economic repercussions. “We also need to distinguish between the position of society and the position of the governments. Russia should respect the need of Kirgizia and Kazakhstan to distance themselves, as this stance is also beneficial to Russia as well. But, in return, it is expected of them to help Russia out with this type of parallel import, it’s a way of getting past the restrictions. Plus, it is also necessary for the local societies, which the West has nothing to offer to, to take a more active position and openly support Russia’s Special Operation in the Ukraine. Russia in turn needs to put in a lot of effort and explain to these societies what its actions are, and the actions of the opponent [and justify its actions].

“All the more so since, as far as I can tell, the majority of the population in Central Asia supports Russia. And therefore we need to interact with these populations as well as with their governments. We need to explain to them how our Special Operation will lead to a new world order, both in the global as well as local sense, in other words in the post-Soviet space. And Russia will inevitably seek to renovate its relationships with all of its allies. Therefore, he who performs better in this crisis, is the one who will receive more of the economic bonuses.”

In conclusion: I have to say that, in reading this piece, I didn’t see a whole lot of evidence that these Central Asian nations are helping Russia against Ukraine, all that much. Unless there is more going on behind the scenes than we know about. But looking on the bright side: Their professed neutrality is way better for Russia than the worst-case scenario as envisioned by the U.S. State Department. When one recalls that all of these nations were on the chopping block for color revolutions and the installation of pro-American governments around Russia’s periphery.

This entry was posted in Friendship of Peoples, Military and War, The Great Game and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Ukraine War Day #127: Russia Versus The World? [concluded]

  1. colliemum says:

    Thanks, yalensis! I’m certain that there’s more going on ‘en coulisse’ than we know or will know.

    Meanwhile, and not that much OT, having had to delve into the NATO Communique, I found what might be the ‘reason’ for the Lithuanian blockade of rail transport of good from Russia to Kaliningrad. In yon communique we read that the next NATO Summit will take place, in 2023, in – deep breath! – Vilnius! This just happens to be the Capital of Lithuania … and of course there cannot possibly have been any quid-pro-quo talks behind closed doors about this event.

    If you’re interested in historical parallels, here’s one. Vilnius was formerly known as Vilna, and it was here that Napoleon, at the start of his invasion of Russia in 1812, reviewed his Grande Armee before setting off. In 2002, a mass grave of Grande Armee soldiers was found – they’d tried to reach this town, after their ‘retreat’ from Moscow, hoping for food, but dying of starvation instead.
    Interesting place, innit – you might also check the later history, e.g. from WWI to the end of WWII. One wonders if the NATO leaders know about this history, especially the Napoleonic one …

    Like

    • yalensis says:

      Thanks for the historical context, colliemum, that’s very pertinent. I vaguely remember reading something in 2002 about those mass graves. Initially the archaeologists thought the soldiers had been tortured, because many of the skeletons showed signs of broken bones in the feet.
      Then came to realize, in horror, that these poor lads (and many of them were just boys; there were also some women among them too, probably camp followers) had ruined their feet from too much walking, after their horses had died. Apparently these troops were on their last legs (literally) by the time they reached Vilna. They knocked on the gates, hoping for welcome, some food, a place to sleep. It was their last hope. But the Vilna burghers locked them out of the gates. In despair, the soldiers of the Grand Armee just lay down in the snow and died. I cannot even comprehend such a level of human suffering. War is hell!

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      • colliemum says:

        Indeed it is – and this retreat was especially brutal. Napoleon, the evil so-and-so, had of course already fled to Paris -’twas not the first time he left his troops in the lurch, letting them find their way home any which way: Egypt, Russia, Leipzig, Waterloo: that ‘great field commander’ always ran away and left it to his marshals to deal with the fallout, the losses, the pain of his people.

        Perhaps, a bit closer to our days, those NATO wannabe ‘war leaders’ might heed the warning of Field Marshal Montgomery who knew a thing or two about war. He said:
        “Rule 1, on page I of the book of war, is: “Do not march on Moscow”. Various people have tried it, Napoleon and Hitler, and it is no good. That is the first rule.”
        Ah well – those who don’t learn from history are condemned to repeat it … ’tis only sad that millions of innocent people will suffer if those NATO “commanders”, those fourth-rate politicians, have their way.

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  2. steve lancs says:

    Hi Yalensis, The link below is to an American financial advisor and is quite lengthy, so I will leave it to you to decide whether to post it or not. The blogger puts forward the theory that everything is going to plan for Russia and that it is the west that has been drawn in to a fight it cannot win, and which will leave it bankrupt. “What’s obvious to me is the neocons and neoliberals controlling the West think they can turn Ukraine into a quagmire for Putin, but what if Putin thinks he can turn Ukraine into a quagmire for them?” https://tomluongo.me/2022/06/29/the-g-7-squawks-but-theyve-already-lost-the-war-against-russia/

    Best wishes,Steve

    Like

  3. S Brennan says:

    Andrei Martyanov’s Blog posted a good one.

    America is far more complex than portrayed, the chasm between what citizens believe/want and the foreign policy that has been shoved down our collective throats has never been wider. This alien foreign policy has been foisted upon us through artifice and lately, state orchestrated violence. In the decades since my birth, honest decent, hardworking American citizens have been humiliated and impoverished in every conceivable manner while ne’erdowells and sycophants have reaped fortunes from this abuse…those miscreants now rule the roost in DC but…let me stop…a good read at:

    https://smoothiex12.blogspot.com/2022/06/i-fully-agree-with-larry-here.html

    Like

  4. the pair says:

    i’ve been seeing as lot of the “don’t blame americans for america” stuff today and it’s somewhat true to a point. yes, the “government” (read as: “corporate middle men”) is an unaccountable bunch of lunatics and cretins…but someone elected them. i struggle to find an rationalization that makes someone voting for tom cotton or joe manchin or adam schiff a “good person”. and does anyone still buy the hipster nonsense “AOC” was selling? i lived in DC for many years after growing up in the south and i can safely say: the people average americans send to DC HATE average americans. class always trumps geography in the beltway.

    i’m assuming the same for the “stans”. i’ve spent time in eastern europe and still have many friends in the region and they all just assume anyone entering government is corrupt. none of them were thrilled to enter the EU and they were even less enthusiastic about NATO. yet those things happened. i think it really will just come down to the “merchant class” to do what they do and ignore the myth of national borders. it is odd that anyone would miss coca cola, though. ew.

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    • yalensis says:

      I actually like the taste of coca cola, but I know it’s bad for me, so I only rarely indulge. I heard it’s good for cleaning car batteries, because so acidic. Wouldn’t want to test that theory though, because it’s also very sticky.
      You know what actually tastes good? Dr. Pepper, it has a certain je sais pas tingle about it that hints of some kind of spice.

      Like

      • joey_n says:

        I’m not sure what’s sticker – soda (not just Coca-Cola, Pepsi or Dr. Pepper) with high-fructose corn syrup (USA), or soda with real sugar in it (the rest of the world, Russia included).
        Nor am I certain if what makes Coca-Cola harmful as you describe is the phosphoric acid or something else (caffeine?), or if the ‘harmful’ factor applies to HFCS-laden or sugary sodas in general.

        I was never devastated at all that Coca-Cola has/had left Russia. I kinda thought that, with an industrial manufacturing sector as advanced as it is, Russia could develop and release its own home-grown alternatives, preferably with fewer harmful ingredients or smaller portions thereof. Then again, my preferred carbonated drinks tend to be fizzy seltzer water with flavorings.

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        • yalensis says:

          From what I understand, the only “harmful” thing about of coca-cola (aside from the sugar) is that the acidity will ruin the enamel on your teeth. But that can be mitigated by brushing or at least rinsing thoroughly right after imbibing.

          Like

      • Bukko Boomeranger says:

        Have you tried Diet Dr. Pepper? It’s the only diet soda that I’ve come across that tastes EXACTLY like its sugary (or in the U.S., high-fructose corn syrupy) original. Great stuff, without the caloric guilt. Aspartame guilt instead! I can find it down here sometimes, particularly at a doughnut shop that used to be named Walker’s American Donuts but they dropped the “A” word a few years ago. I think the country’s brand might be getting a bit “on the nose” (Oz slang for “stinky”) these days.

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        • yalensis says:

          Never tried Diet Pepper, isn’t aspartame bad for you? Maybe not.
          Like the looks of that donut shop. My personal favorite, FYI, is Boston Creme pie. But they can’t change the name, it still has to be Boston!

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  5. nicolaavery says:

    I used to use it occasionally to clean a squat toilet in Turkiye and I used to drink it as well. Not at the same time. I got the tip from a friend who worked at a biscuit factory where they used it occasionally to clean pipes. Good for clearing rust off coins as well.

    Like

  6. raccoonburbleca says:

    Okay, Awful Avalanchers. Here is the final installment of my work on the Donbass republics. I think it complements well what this blog has. https://yaxls.wordpress.com/2022/06/27/the-donbas-story-3/

    Like

  7. Beluga says:

    Well, Russia has given up Snake Island, and the Ukies claim to have achieved this military miracle by their incomparable military might.

    What I read earlier today on Indian Punchline was Russia saying “we’ll leave the island so Ukraine can de-mine the local sea area of their drifting weapons and then get on with its action rather than blather about supplying grain to feed the world from Odessa. We won’t stand in the way of Ukraine doing its humanitarian rang-a-ding-dang-do.”

    In other words, its sh!t or get off the pot time for Elenskiiy. You can have this islet of rock, say the Russians — now do the right thing and get on with the job you say you want to do.

    But the Ukies are so fracking dumb, they literally think they won it back! And are crowing about it. I did not read that Russia said to Ukraine, OK sure, set the place up as a missile base, why dontcha? But we all know that’s exactly what these sh!t for brains people will try to do, and to hell with the mines and their responsibility to clear them away and ship grain to Eritrea or wherever. No, they’re big strapping warriors who shooed the scared Russians away with a volley of missiles and artillery. Sure. We believe you.

    Three things strike me. The Russians are giving the Ukies enough rope to hang themselves on their claim of we-supply-the-world-with-grain-but-the-Russians-are-stopping-us routine. The island isn’t of vast strategic importance as I’ve been saying all along or the Russians wouldn’t have voluntarily left. If the place is now set up as a missile base because the Ukies are too dumb to do anything but that since they think they’re supermen, then when construction has just about finished on batteries of HIMARS and Harpoons, a dreadful roar will approach from the sky as per Billy Graham, and Snake Island will be turned to dust. Or maybe it’ll be a silent hypersonic MIRV Sarmat. Splat-a dat dat. Exit stage left. Or is that exit stage extreme right?

    I bet no grain whatsoever will the Ukies ever ship. They give not a damn for anything but themselves. And to prove that self-hypnosis is a lot easier to learn than we all thought, here’s some snippets from NBC New Yawk:

    “Unable to withstand the impact of our artillery, missile and aviation units, the Russian occupiers have left Snake Island. The Odesa region is completely liberated,” the Ukrainian military said in its regular social media update Thursday evening.

    A senior Ukrainian military official, Oleksiy Gromov, earlier said Kyiv was planning to deploy troops to Snake Island, but did not specify a timeline.

    “At the moment, we control (the island) with the help of our weapons: long-range artillery, rocket units and aviation,” Gromov said.”

    You have to giggle at Gromov. He was still reading from yesterday’s hymn sheet, even as the scared-to-death Russkies left, cowed beyond all measure! Yes, and in a feat of Ukrainian illogical incorrelation, Odesa is now completely liberated! Woohoo!

    Like

    • Bukko Boomeranger says:

      Yalensis, I tuned in today to see your esteemed explanation of the ramifications of the latest on Snake Island, because you’ve been all over that rock. At least Beluga did not let me down! What made me curious was because the ABC (“A” for Australian) radio news bulletin @ 0700 today spun it as “Russia retreated from Snake Island and the Ukranians will re-occupy it” implying it was a war victory. I’m sure that’s not the case. I reckon that with the Harpoon and similar missiles that have been supplied to the Ukies, it’s too risky to send resupply boats to the island with vodka and shashlik for the drunken Russian troops there.

      I still don’t know why anyone or thing would want Snake Island, especially snakes. It’s got too many cliffs for them — they’d fall off the side and never get back up. Particularly those poor female snakes slithering around looking for those man-snakes that don’t even exist!

      Like

      • yalensis says:

        Slava to both Beluga and Bukko: You guys beat me to the punch! I have a post on Snake Island, sure enough, but it won’t be ready for an hour and so. Hey, give me a break guys, it’s only 5:00 AM here where I live, and I have to write this post and get it up BEFORE I go for my morning workout, which is BEFORE I go to work. Actually, my take on the Snake is a bit different from Beluga’s, but you’ll see. I heard about the Snake thing yesterday right after I had already posted, but, just like Perry White, I knew that was going to be my lead story for today. So, it isn’t exactly breaking news, but at least a day gave it some time to marinate somewhat.

        Even though, like I said, my take is a tad different from Beluga’s, it’s not really like a fierce debate. All the points that people are making (even mutually-contradictory) are actually valid, because these various Schrödinger particles have not yet collapsed into the wave of truth.

        Like

        • Bukko Boomeranger says:

          Just jiving about your sloth re: Snake. I appreciate how you bang out something new every day, and you’ve been on the alternaRussosphere task for years. It can’t be easy to knock out so many words for free. Don’t let it break you the way it did Andrei at The Saker.

          Like

          • yalensis says:

            Hey, Bukko, I knew you were just jivin’ and that’s okay. Don’t worry about me, I love blogging, it’s my favorite hobby. I enjoy writing in general, I find it psychologically soothing to craft thoughts into words, also helps me deal with all my underlying psychological anxiety; in other words, it’s therapeutic for me. Would have been a professional writer if it paid, but only very few people can make a living from it, so thank goodness I have a real job too.
            Having said that, I’ve been banging out content since, goodness, has it been 2015? And it was almost daily, although I didn’t put pressure on myself to literally be every day, that was just a vow I took when this war started. (Thinking the war would only last for a few weeks – how stupid I was!)
            🙂

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      • yalensis says:

        P.S. – Bukko, you underestimate the nimbleness and agility of those female snakes. These things are hardy cliff slitherers, they put mountain goats to shame. Plus, they don’t need men snakes because they got sick of the toxic (or should I said “venomous”) masculinity!

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