Anniversary of Gaddafi’s Murder – Part I

This piece from VZGLIAD was written by reporter Darya Mitina.  Tis the five-year anniversary since the murder of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.  At the moment of his death, the West announced the successful end of the Libyan Civil War.  In reality, the war still continues, and took turns which even the gloomiest pessimists could not have predicted.  Even U.S. President Obama “admitted” that this war was a “mistake”.  But it was not actually a mistake, it was a crime.

Exactly five years ago the world witnessed the brutal torture and murder of the Libyan leader.  Thanks to modern technology, a teenager can call his parents on his mobile phone and post to the internet somebody being tortured, in real time.  Technological progress allowed NATO operatives to pick out a column of vehicles near the city of Sirte.  Modern technology allowed French planes to bomb the column.  French Defense Minister Gérard Longuet bragged about this later, like he had done something really cool.   The destruction of Gaddafi’s convoy placed the aging ruler at the mercy of an enraged mob.  The jihadists  tortured and murdered Gaddafi while videotaping the entire ordeal and laying it out on the internet for the world to see.  LIke they had done something really cool.

Libyan schoolchildren demonstrate against U.S. air raids.

It has been five years since the destruction of the Jamahiriya, a socialistic philosophy of government and civil society developed by Gaddafi and his political supporters.  Like the (different flavor of) Soviet  socialism, the Jamahiriya was viciously attacked and defeated by the West.  Westie ideology cannot tolerate any form of socialism.  Only capitalist/authoritarian and class-based forms of government are tolerated.  The Jamahiriya system worked.  Implemented over the course of 40 years, it turned Libya into a modern, industrialized and prosperous nation – converted it from a country of illiterate bedouins and craftsmen into a modern nation populated by doctors and engineers — a nation in which education, even higher education, was free of charge.  This nation, where different ethnic groups and tribes lived together peacefully; a nation with the highest standard of living on the African continent; a nation which lived debt-free possessing billions of dollars of sovereign wealth in oil and gold — is now a ruined and bankrupt hellhole, a place of chaos and inter-tribal bloodletting.  A nation that was raped, looted, and left to die.  By the West.  Thousands of people were killed in the NATO bombings.  Tens of thousands more perished in the ensuing chaos and civil war.  Hundreds of thousands of refugees were forced to scattered across the world.  Hundreds of thousands of Libyan children stopped going to school, and 1400 schools were converted into army barracks or transit points for refugees.

SitRep:  Headchoppers In Charge

The current political situation in Libya is that there are three competing governments:  A so-called “secular” government in Tripoli; a military government in Tobruk; and an Islamist government in Benghazi.  The Benghazi one is affiliated with ISIS and Al Qaeda.  These were the same jihadi “militants” who were armed and geared up by the Westies, used as mercenary forces to overthrow Gaddafi.  They were the first to fly the black “Al Qaeada” flag over Benghazi.  Gaddafi called them “rats” and “terrorists” and vowed to drive them out of Benghazi.  Instead, the Al Qaeda “rats” defeated and murdered him.  But they could not have achieved this without a lot of help from the West.

By a cruel irony of fate, the capital of the jihadis is the city of Sirte.  This was Gaddafi’s hometown, and the fountain of the Jamahiriya socialist revolution.  Today the central square contains a chopping block, where Islamists chop off hands and heads, and where the black flag of Al Qaeda waves proudly.

Andrei Kozyrev and Bubba meet in the White House

In the early 1990’s Gaddafi, a very perceptive man, could see clearly what was happening with the Soviet Union and Russia.  As the Soviet Union disintegrated, partly as a result of Westie attacks and subversion,  the new American vassal state of Russia joined the West in imposing unfair economic sanctions upon Libya.  I don’t have time to go into that whole backstory here, but long story short, Westies hated Libya for several reasons, including (1) craving their oil, (2) hating socialism, and (3) Goldman Sachs using NATO as its air force to solve private merchant disputes — anyhow,  Colonel Gadaffi complained thusly to the new Russian leaders:  “You have reneged on all your obligations, you have torn up all your agreements, you have destroyed all the traditions of friendship and good neighborliness, by joining in on these anti-Libyan sanctions.  You have bent over completely to the West.”   At the moment the Soviet Union dissolved, it owed $7 billion dollars to Libya.  The Russian Federation inherited this sovereign debt.  Gaddafi decided to call in his marker.  Then-Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrei Kozyrev, refused to pony up the cash, retorting that Russia must abide by Western sanctions against Libya.  “Otherwise Washington will not approve.”

Kozyrev is a typical product of the Gorbachev “glasnost” era; as wiki points out:  “Seizing the opportunity opened by Gorbachev’s glasnost in summer 1989, Kozyrev wrote an article repudiating the Leninist concept of the “international class struggle,” the very essence of Leninism.  Firstly published in the Soviet press, the article was reproduced in the Washington Post and other major news sources all over the world, making him known as a political figure.”

Well, the international class struggle never actually ended, of course, so what Kozyrev repudiated was not the notion itself, nor the existence of said class struggle, but just which side he wanted to be on.  Nowadays Kozyrev lives in the U.S. and calls upon the American government to attack Russia.

[to be continued]

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This entry was posted in Human Dignity, Military and War, The Great Game, True Crime and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Anniversary of Gaddafi’s Murder – Part I

  1. PaulR says:

    There were some legitimate reasons for not liking Gaddafi, such as his provision of weapons to the Provisional IRA.

    Like

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